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« Walking For Brain Health | Main | Smaller Servings, Please »
Thursday
Oct202016

Diet And Depression

We know that eating a Mediterranean diet can help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke, and new evidence published this month suggests that it also may protect against depression. Researchers from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria studied more than 15,000 people who were following the recommendations of a Mediterranean-like diet for more than 8 years. None of the participants were depressed when they joined the study, and they were asked to score their adherence to the diets by rating meats and sweets negatively and nuts, fruits and vegetables positively. The researchers reported that the higher the score, the greater the adherence to a healthy diet. Over 8.5 years, 1,550 of the participants reported that they had been diagnosed with depression or had used antidepressant drugs. The researchers concluded that the greatest reduction in the risk of depression was linked to a diet called the “Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010”, which is similar to the Mediterranean Diet in that in emphasizes foods providing omega-3 fatty acids, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts and a moderate alcohol intake. They wrote that even a moderate adherence to the diets was associated with a reduced risk of depression and that there was no additional benefit to high or very high adherence. The researchers said further studies are needed to identify what nutrients are protective, and which might contribute to depression.

My take: This is an interesting study, which supports the view that an anti-inflammatory diet may counter whole body inflammation, a possible contributor to psychological disorders, especially depression. While I don't think that inflammation is the only factor leading to depression, much of the reported rise in the rates of depression may be due to inflammation fostered by increased consumption of highly processed foods, including quick-digesting carbohydrate foods.  An anti-inflammatory diet, which is modeled on the Mediterranean diet with Asian influences, promotes foods that can help control inflammation, as well as the micronutrients and phytonutrients to protect your body (and mind) from inflammation's damaging effects. 

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