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Wednesday
Sep252013

How to Make Turkish Spinach Salad (Video)

Dr. Weil demonstrates how to make a Turkish Spinach Salad - a dish that highlights the natural flavors and simplicity of the Mediterranean diet. Be sure to use a good-quality extra virgin olive oil.

Here is the recipe for Turkish Spinach Salad: http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/RCP00199/Turkish-Spinach-Salad.html

Tuesday
Sep242013

Fatigue and Fatty Foods

You can avoid daytime sleepiness if you skip fats at breakfast and lunch and opt for carbohydrates instead If your energy begins to flag late in the afternoon, the problem may be what you’ve eaten earlier in the day. A new study from Penn State’s College of Medicine showed that you can avoid daytime sleepiness if you skip fats at breakfast and lunch and opt for carbohydrates instead (protein consumption didn’t seem to make any difference). In this small study the connection of dietary fats to daytime sleepiness held true regardless of participants’ gender, age, body mass index, total calorie consumption and how well they sleep at night. The 31 participants spent four consecutive nights in a sleep lab. They ranged in age from 18 to 65 years, all were healthy, none were obese, and all habitually slept normally. They were given meals five times during the study to assess dietary influences, and the participants’ daytime sleepiness was evaluated with the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). The researchers noted that earlier studies have found that diet affects sleepiness as perceived by participants (subjective sleepiness), while the current study shows a similar association between diet and sleepiness as measured in the sleep lab (objective sleepiness). The results of the investigation were presented at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC in June 2013.

Source:
“Diet Linked to Daytime Sleepiness and Alertness in Healthy Adults,” Science Daily, May 7, 2013, accessed July 13, 2013 , http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130507164632.htm

Monday
Sep232013

Happy Heart News

People with cheerful temperaments seem to have some in-built protection against heart attacksThat old song “Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella” seems to have relevance to heart health. A new study from John’s Hopkins shows that people with cheerful temperaments seem to have some in-built protection against heart attacks and are less likely to die suddenly of heart problems than those who are anxious and depressed. Similar findings have emerged from earlier studies, but this new investigation showed that even if you’re at high risk, being cheerful, relaxed, energetic and satisfied with life reduces your chances of experiencing a coronary event by 50 percent compared to anxious and depressed patients. This held true even after accounting for such factors as age, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

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Friday
Sep202013

What Type of Milk Do You Prefer? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed milk substitutes and which is best: What Kind of Milk is Best? Check out the article and let us know which type of milk you enjoy the most!

Thursday
Sep192013

New Rules for Beating Prostate Cancer

Keeping your weight down and exercising regularly can lower the risk of aggressive tumors in men diagnosed with early prostate cancerWatching what you eat (very carefully), keeping your weight down and exercising regularly can lower the risk of aggressive tumors in men diagnosed with early prostate cancer. The formula for success, however, requires sticking to more than four of eight lifestyle recommendations designed to improve cancer survival from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). This is the first published study of how well the WCRF plan works. The data shows that failure to follow at least four of the rules leads to a 38 percent increased risk of aggressive tumors compared to men who abided by four or more WCRF recommendations. The researchers, at UCLA, report that the most protective strategy was keeping red meat intake below 500 grams (just over one pound) per week (the WCRF suggests that cutting back to 300 grams per week would be better). Another winning recommendation: limiting calorie intake to 125 calories per 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of food. The UCLA team looked at adherence to the WCRF recommendations among 2,212 men 40 to 70 years old newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. The study was published online ahead of print on July 1, 2013 in the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

Source:
Lenore Arab et al, “Adherence to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations Reduces Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness among African and Caucasian Americans,” Nutrition and Cancer, published online July 1, 2013.

Wednesday
Sep182013

Omega-3s for Vegetarians (Video)

Fish are undoubtedly the best source of omega-3 fatty acids in the human diet, which poses a problem for vegetarians and vegans. Here, Dr. Joseph Hibbeln, lead clinical investigator at the National Institutes of Public Health and internationally recognized authority on the link between essential fatty acids and depression, explains what measures those who do not eat fish should take to prevent an omega-3 deficiency.

Tuesday
Sep172013

The Simple Reason Why Night Owls Gain Weight

Late night nibbling translates into too many excess caloriesThe less you sleep, the more likely you are to gain weight, and a new study suggests why: late night nibbling translates into too many excess calories. The study, from the University of Pennsylvania, showed that participants in a laboratory sleep study whose shut-eye was limited to four hours per night for five nights, bumped up their daily intake of calories during the wee hours until their four a.m. bedtime. The researchers also reported that the proportion of calories from fat consumed by the night owls was higher late at night than earlier in the day. The other study participants were allowed a lot more sleep – from 10 p.m. until 8 a.m. A total of 225, healthy, non-obese adults age 22 to 50 participated in the study. Among those randomly selected to sleep only four hours per night, men gained more weight than women, and African-Americans gained more than Caucasians. During the study, meals were served at scheduled times, but participants had around-the-clock access to food in the lab kitchen. No exercise was permitted. The findings were published in the July 2013, issue of the journal Sleep.

Source:
Andrea M. Spaeth et al, “Effects of Experimental Sleep Restriction on Weight Gain, Caloric Intake, and Meal Timing in Healthy Adults,” http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.2792

Monday
Sep162013

Have You Been Working Your Brain Hard Enough?

Keep your mind and memory from slipping as you ageThe “use it or lose it” principle, applied to the brain, can help keep your mind and memory from slipping as you age. Researchers at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center followed 294 individuals to see how strongly maintaining mental activity influenced age-related cognitive decline and memory problems. Over the course of 5.8 years, the team tested the study participants’ memory and cognitive abilities and questioned them about how much reading they had done throughout life, including whether they were read to as children. The investigators also asked about mentally stimulating activities such as going to the theater or to museums as adults, playing challenging games such as chess, reading a book and predicting what will happen next or comparing a movie you’ve just seen to others. After each study participant died, the researchers examined samples of brain tissue and, after adjusting for signs of brain disease, compared their findings with the earlier test results. The result?

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