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Friday
Aug292014

When Was The Last Time You Took An Antibiotic? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed antibiotics and whether they are helping or hurting by creating "superbug" infections: Unnecessary Antibiotics? Check out the article and let us know when the last time was you took an antibiotic for a bacterial infection.

Thursday
Aug282014

10 Foods for Healthy Blood Sugar Levels, Part 2

We continue our look at foods that can help keep your blood sugar levels optimized with five more to add to your diet. Find out what to put on your next grocery list!

Tuesday's post covered five foods for healthy blood sugar levels, from green leafy veggies to onions. Today we look at five more - add these foods to your diet, as they may help lower blood sugar levels.

  1. Maitake mushrooms. One of Dr. Weil’s favorites, maitake not only contain compounds that enhance immune function, but in one study people with type 2 diabetes were given maitake along with diabetes medication, and the result was lower blood sugar readings. Cook some up and serve them as a side dish!
  2. Underground vegetables. Also known as “tubers,” veggies such as leeks, potatoes and yams have been shown in studies to lower or return to normal high blood sugar levels.
  3. Brewer’s yeast. Rich in essential amino acids and B vitamins, brewer’s yeast may also lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, and may improve glucose tolerance, increase insulin sensitivity, and lower cholesterol as well. Shake some on your next batch of popped corn!
  4. Prickly pear. The green pads of this plant are called nopal, and is more than a staple in Mexican cuisine – it is very low on the glycemic index and may have blood-sugar-lowering effects. Look for it at specialty or ethnic grocers.
  5. Bitter melon. When cooked and added to other dishes, bitter melon will impart a unique flavor that may help glucose tolerance of people with type 2 diabetes, and help keep blood sugar levels in the normal range.
Tuesday
Aug262014

10 Foods for Healthy Blood Sugar Levels, Part 1

Want to help keep your blood sugar levels steady? Look to your diet – certain foods may lower blood sugar or stabilize it at healthy levels. These may be especially helpful for people with diabetes. What works best?

To keep blood sugar levels stable, regular exercise is helpful – but a healthy diet is a must. Add these foods to your diet, as they may help lower blood sugar levels.

  1. Green, leafy vegetables. Broccoli, spinach, and kale are good sources of fiber – which helps regulate blood sugar levels - and are high in vitamins A, C, and K as well. Plus, some studies have shown that eating vegetables can help prevent diabetes, so aim for four to five servings per day.
  2. Beans and legumes. Beans of almost any variety as well as lentils are rich in folic acid, magnesium, potassium and soluble fiber – and are low-glycemic-load foods. Make sure you get one to two servings per day.
  3. Cabbage. A very low-glycemic index food (near zero!), cabbage is high in fiber, low in calories, inexpensive and versatile. It’s especially useful for stabilizing blood-sugar levels because it converts to sugar very slowly in the body. Try eating more slaw, sauerkraut or kimchi.
  4. Okra. This southern staple is high in soluble fiber - which slows down the digestion of carbohydrates and can help stabilize blood sugar – and is also a low glycemic-index food. Try adding it to your next pot of soup.
  5. Onions. This kitchen staple is more than a tasty addition to many dishes – onions offer blood-sugar lowering effects.

Don’t miss Thursday’s tip when we cover five more foods that are beneficial to healthy blood sugar levels!

Monday
Aug252014

Why You Should Eat Lemons

When life gives you lemons… use them! Lemons are not only a tasty warm weather fruit, but offer health benefits as well. A citrus fruit, lemons are a good source of vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that helps to keep the immune system strong.

Lemons come in both sour (Eureka and Lisbon) and relatively sweet (Meyer) varieties. Look for a lemon that is heavy for its size, which indicates less skin and more flesh. The peel should have a finely grained texture and be fully yellow. You can use both the flesh and the peel (as a zest if the lemon is organic) in all types of dishes, so enjoy – we like them in the Lemon Olive Oil Cake recipe.

And don’t limit the lemons to cooking - lemons make an effective, natural cleaning product for your home. To clean and polish wood furniture, add two tablespoons of lemon juice to 10 drops of (real) lemon oil and a few drops of jojoba oil.

Friday
Aug222014

What Kind of Cutting Board Do You Use? (Poll)

A recent Q&A discussed cutting boards and which are the safest to use when cooking in the kitchen: Best Cutting Board? Check out the article and let us know which type of cutting board you use in your kitchen.

Thursday
Aug212014

Danger at the Nail Salon?

Although it's unlikely, it remains possible that women could develop skin cancer from too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light while their nail polish or gel manicures dry, and there have been a few rare case studies where women did develop non-melanoma, squamous cell skin cancer on areas of their hands that were repeatedly exposed to UVA light used in nail salons. To get a better sense of the possible danger, researchers from Georgia Regents University did a random sampling of lamps in 17 nail salons to see how much UV radiation is emitted when nails are drying. They found a wide variation ranging from “barely” to “significant,” said study lead author Lyndsay R. Shipp, but reported nothing to warrant anything more than caution. Previous studies have noted that the exposures to salon lamps are likely not significant contributors to increased risks of skin cancer, and Shipp notes she uses the UV machines at the nail salon every few months and will continue to do so. “You can get that amount of exposure when driving down the road in your car,” she told The New York Times.

Sources:
Deborah F. MacFarlane, and Carol A. Alonso, “Occurrence of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers on the Hands After UV Nail Light Exposure,” Archives of Dermatology, 2009;145(4):447-449. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2008.622.

Lyndsay R. Schipp et al, “Further Investigation Into the Risk of Skin Cancer Associated With the Use of UV Nail Lamps,” JAMA Dermatology, doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.8740

Wednesday
Aug202014

Motivating for Health and Well-Being (Video)

Fear is a common motivator in health - when something goes wrong with our health, we are motivated to see a doctor and find a quick fix. Dr. Weil believes fear is not a good motivator for good health and instead believes education is a better option for motivation of making lifestyle changes. See what else Dr. Weil says about motivating people to make better choices in life and their health.

Want new videos from Dr. Weil? Subscribe to his YouTube channel for weekly videos!

Tuesday
Aug192014

How Not to Help Young Girls Lose Weight

Telling a young girl that she’s fat may backfire on your good intentions and put her at risk of obesity in her teens. A new study from UCLA checked the weights of more than 2,300 10-year-old girls in California, Washington, D.C. and Cincinnati. The researchers noted that at the start of the study 58 percent of the girls reported that they had been told they were too fat by a parent, sibling, teacher, classmate or friend. When the researchers went back to check the girls at age 19, they found that the ones who had been told they were too fat years earlier were 1.66 times more likely to be obese than other girls in the study. This held true even after the researchers factored in the girls’ actual weight, their income, race, and when they reached puberty. “We nearly fell off our chairs when we discovered this," said study senior author A. Janet Tomiyama in a UCLA press release. When people feel bad, they tend to eat more, not decide to diet or take a jog, she said. Making people feel bad about their weight could increase their levels of cortisol [the stress hormone], which generally leads to weight gain.

Sources:
A.J. Tomiyama and J.M. Hunger, “Weight Labeling and Obesity: A Longitudinal Study of Girls Aged 10 to 19 years,” JAMA Pediatrics, doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.